Smart Cities Solving Parking and Driving Challenges

Smart cities and cars are getting even smarter as technological disruption continues to shake up the transportation industry. By 2021, more than 380 million connected cars are expected to be on the road, as automakers plan to connect the majority of the vehicles they sell, according to research from BI Intelligence. This connectivity is leading to
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He’s Helping Pittsburgher Drivers Get The Green Light

About six years ago, Stephen Smith was stopped at a traffic light in East Liberty, driving home from Carnegie Mellon University. The robotics professor had been working over a tricky problem — how to make urban traffic flow more efficiently. Computer simulations showed his proposed system worked, but he needed a place to test it
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Pittsburgh’s AI Traffic Signals Will Make Driving Less Boring

Idling in rush-hour traffic can be mind numbing. It also carries other costs. Traffic congestion costs the U.S. economy $121 billion a year, mostly due to lost productivity, and produces about 25 billion kilograms of carbon dioxide emissions, Carnegie Mellon University professor of robotics Stephen Smith told the audience at a White House Frontiers Conference last week.
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Five surprising ways AI could be a part of our lives by 2030

Artificial intelligence (AI) has gradually become an integral part of modern life, from Siri and Spotify’s personalized features on our phones to automatic fraud alerts from our banks whenever a transaction appears suspicious. Defined simply, a computer with AI is able to respond to its environment by learning on its own—without humans providing specific instructions.
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Pittsburgh’s Smart City proposal combines data, energy and transportation

Pittsburgh’s application for the $50 million Smart City Challenge grant calls for a series of transportation spines, traffic signals that give priority to transit and freight vehicles, and an “electric avenue” between Downtown and Hazelwood for driverless vehicles charged at solar power stations. … A key element of the Pittsburgh proposal would be a ”smart
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Emergence as Regional Tech Hub Reflected in Pittsburgh’s Smart City Challenge Bid

Pittsburgh, meanwhile, has strong existing ties with local universities when it comes to transportation. At Carnegie Mellon, researchers affiliated with the Traffic21 Institute, and an initiative known as Metro21, work on technology that has already been tested in the city. One of the proposals in Pittsburgh’s Smart City Challenge application calls for wider deployment of a traffic
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Green Lights All the Way

It’s green lights all the way baby in parts of Pittsburgh due to the implementation of a decentralized traffic system overseen by a Carnegie Mellon robotics professor. The adaptive traffic control signal system from Surtrac uses a combination of traffic theory and artificial intelligence to follow traffic flow on a real-time basis. The signals at intersections are controlled by
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Alleviating Congestion On Pittsburgh’s North Shore

It’s a well-known Pittsburgh piece of advice: don’t go to the North Shore on game days if you don’t have to.  The riverfront neighborhood is routinely congested by drivers and pedestrians during events.  The Stadium Authority of the City of Pittsburgh is looking to alleviate some of that congestion and has hired East Liberty-based Rapid Flow
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Pittsburgh’s North Shore traffic gets critical look

An East Liberty company that helped reduce traffic delays in that busy East End neighborhood is being recruited to do the same on the North Shore, where major sporting events and concerts routinely tie up traffic. “It’s not possible to remove congestion after a major event. But we can make that period of clearing out
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Stadium authority could hire consultant to study, help improve North Shore traffic

Anyone who has tried to get out of the gridlock that is the North Shore after a Steelers game knows that traffic conditions could be improved, to put it mildly. Some help — or at least study — may be on the way. Pittsburgh’s stadium authority is expected to vote Thursday on whether to hire
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